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2017 (Vol. 9, Issue: 1)
Research Article

A Chemometric Comparison of Organic Manure from Different Animal Sources using a Principal Component Analysis

1Nnamdi Ugochinyere Nwahara, 1Khethang Paul Mothoako, 1Thabo John Samosamo, 1Relebohile Suzan Taasi, 1Mampiti Alice Posholi, 1Lebitso Shale, 2Sissay Bekele Mekbib and 1Mosotho Joseph George
1Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology
2Department of Biology, National University of Lesotho, P.O. Roma 180, Lesotho-Southern Africa
 

DOI: 10.19026/ajas.9.4192
Submitted Accepted Published
‎July ‎5, ‎2016 August ‎9, ‎2016 March 15, 2017

  How to Cite this Article:

1Nnamdi Ugochinyere Nwahara, 1Khethang Paul Mothoako, 1Thabo John Samosamo, 1Relebohile Suzan Taasi, 1Mampiti Alice Posholi, 1Lebitso Shale, 2Sissay Bekele Mekbib and 1Mosotho Joseph George, 2017. A Chemometric Comparison of Organic Manure from Different Animal Sources using a Principal Component Analysis.  Asian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 9(1): 1-7.

DOI: 10.19026/ajas.9.4192

URL: http://www.maxwellsci.com/jp/mspabstract.php?jid=AJAS&doi=ajas.9.4192

Abstract:


This study was conducted to determine the physico-chemical properties of organic manure from different animal sources, namely: farm and village cows a pig and layers chicken droppings. The application of principal component was used to differentiate between these sources. Several physico-chemical parameters including ash content, pH, conductivity, as well as some nutrients were used as variables. The results showed differences between the four animals with the chicken affording the largest variation (PC1 = 62.5%) then the pig (PC2 = 4.5%) while the two cow samples overlapped showing that both animals do not differ significantly. The major contributor to the difference between the samples was conductivity (about 90%), a property that is conferred by the dissolved ions irrespective of their identities, followed by calcium (about 35%), a vital element in layers chicken for egg shell formation, hence a major nutrient in the chicken feed. The major contributors in the second component, ascribed more by the pig, were potassium, copper, zinc and iron, while the other parameters did not confer much difference. This report therefore demonstrates that the chicken manure contains more dissolved ions than the other samples. This may not necessarily be an advantage since the basal level of soil ion content needs to be evaluated before application of any manure. However, the study has demonstrated the application of multivariate analysis in comparison of the organic manure and has differentiated the organic manure by animal source.

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    Competing interests

The authors have no competing interests.
    Open Access Policy

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

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© The Author(s) 2017

ISSN (Online):  2041-3890
ISSN (Print):   2041-3882
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